• LETTERS / The Need to Support Small Biz During Coronavirus

    March 27, 2020 Letters to the Editor. BY GREGG THOMPSON / Dear Readers, Social distancing is taking its toll on North Carolina’s small businesses. We don’t have state-specific numbers, but a new survey by the National Federation of Independent Business says 76% of the nation’s small business owners say they’ve been affected in some way by the COVID-19 outbreak. Over half say sales are down, while 23% say the coronavirus has affected their supply chain. One in five owners surveyed by NFIB said the outbreak hasn’t affected them, but most think it will eventually. As NFIB’s state director, this troubles me, because small business is the heart and soul of North Carolina’s economy. According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, small businesses account for 99.6% of all employers in the state, and they employ about 44% of the state’s workforce.  Read more…



  • LETTERS / Compassion is the Key

    March 23, 2020 Letters to the Editor. BY DAVID JACKSON / Dear Readers, I’m not sure if there are enough words in our language to accurately describe what we have experienced as a community over these past days. A month ago, we were locked into a familiar pattern that saw Thursday’s snow lead to Saturday’s skiers. Our hotels and restaurants were filled with visitors and we were optimistic that a strong fall and winter was going to keep early 2020 moving in a positive economic direction. Fast forward to today and the surroundings and circumstances we knew as the bedrocks of our community became covered in uncertainty. Every day has birthed a new challenge to overcome. As the days pass, these challenges manifest into conversations we never thought we’d have with our families, friends, and co-workers. While some communities have the economic diversity to absorb a major blow to certain sectors, our area depends on so many of the things that have been ripped from us under these circumstances. The displacement of our students, visitors, and unfortunately, too many faces of a workforce that serve as they backbone to our unique, thriving businesses, has left a void.  Read more…



  • LETTERS / Ensemble Stage Looks to Their 2020 Season With a Message of Hope

    March 20, 2020 Letters to the Editor. BY GARY SMITH / Dear Editor, First let’s talk about that great big elephant in the room. Actually, I’ll start by not referring to it as an elephant. Elephants are awesome and one of the world’s most intelligent and majestic creatures. Therefore, I won’t disparage them by creating any association between them and what we all are now facing. However, something I want everyone to keep in mind, there is nothing stronger than the human spirit, there is nothing stronger than our will to persevere, and there is nothing stronger than the insanely creative power of our imagination. Even Einstein realized that when he said, “Imagination is more important than knowledge.”. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Biggest Smoking Gun of 911

    March 10, 2020 Letters to the Editor. BY CRAIG DUDLEY / Dear Editor, I once was part of the flock. I believed what the TV and schools told me and regarded those who opposed those ‘official truths’ as madmen, performing my assigned function as a ‘consumer’. Then I stumbled across minor bits of evidence that grew into larger pieces indicating that many of those official truths were false. A curious thing about people is how they get an idea fixed in their mind and seem willing to fight to defend what ‘information’ they were given by another, as if they’re defending a castle. It’s the red pill vs the blue. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Making Sure Rural Gets Counted: Census 2020

    February 20, 2020 Letters to the Editor. BY COLIN WILLIAMS / At the Rural Center, we’ve had the privilege to work in communities all across rural North Carolina, and we’ve seen firsthand that it’s not the size or location of a town that makes it a great place to live and raise a family, it’s the people who make it a community. However, people are only one essential ingredient for thriving rural communities. The other part? Well, that’s a more complicated question, but it boils down to a combination of resources and representation. The 2020 Census will be a defining moment for our state, but especially for the people who call the 80 rural counties in North Carolina home. Why? Read more…



  • LETTERS / A Valentine to Afterschool

    February 14, 2020 Letters to the Editor. BY BECKY WEATHERS / This Valentine’s Day, I am writing this letter to tell you how Community Kids Afterschool has been a blessing to me. My granddaughter came to live with me nine months ago. I had to start over, so I needed all the help I could get!  The Afterschool staff at Riverside Elementary helped her with her homework, as well as offer many other activities and projects. She loves it and all the teachers are great. I don’t have to worry! I know where she is and that she is safe. When I pick her up from afterschool, I know her homework is always done. All I have to do is fix her supper and make sure she is bathed, ready for the next day.  I can’t put it all down in words what Afterschool means to me. It is a great program for working parents and grandparents! This Valentine’s Day, I can honestly say that I love my granddaughter’s afterschool program. It’s great! Read more…



  • LETTERS / Earth Fare Closing Down

    February 4, 2020 Letters to the Editor. BY CHERYL WHEELER / To whom it may concern, I spent two hours just walking around Earth Fare yesterday in the mountains of Boone, N.C., and just listening to all of the many voices, from the customers to the employees, talk about the closing of their beloved Health Food Store. They had just gotten word at 8 a.m. that morning that the doors would be closing, and not just to their store alone, but all Earth Fare stores everywhere. There was a sense of shock, loss, and deep sadness in the atmosphere. It reminded me of a movie in a way. You may have seen it, “You’ve Got Mail,” when the city of New York experienced the closing of a very tiny but lovely little family-owned bookstore called “The Shop Around the Corner.” It was special. It meant something to a whole lot of people, as does our Earth Fare that we have all come to love and appreciate. This isn’t just a grocery store. It is a family of people feeling connected to each other, learning to eat well, and feed their families well, and feel alive. It meant something and “It is personal!” Read more…



  • LETTERS / The Question is Whose Conspiracy?

    January 3, 2020 Letters to the Editor. BY CRAIG DUDLEY / Dear Editor, The vast majority of polls I’ve seen indicate ‘consumers’ have no trust in the media or the government. Some statistics put that level of trust somewhere around ten percent. It’s easy to know why that is: experience. Those entities have repeatedly proven themselves to be liars or fools. The thing that amazes me is why, when they have no trust in those bodies, they still act and speak as though what ‘official sources’ tell them is true: they show no evidence of questioning the things the TV and schools present. 9/11 was a result of a conspiracy, whether you believe the ‘official story’ or have joined the large number of American’s who see more holes in that official explanation than would be found in a cheese grater. The question is whose conspiracy? Read more…



  • LETTERS / Operation Christmas Kindness – A Local Story

    December 23, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY The Maynard Family / Dear Editor, My name is McKenzie. I am the mother of a wonderful, kind, and giving 4-year-old-boy named Koen. I know every parent thinks that about their child but continue to read on and I’ll explain why I feel this way about my little boy. In the last two years, Koen has told me and his father that he wanted to be Santa Claus so he can do good and help people find Christmas cheer. The last few times he has told us this, we have thought it was cute and went on with the holiday season, but this year was different. Koen has been persistent in his request for a Santa outfit and when we ask him why his answer is always the same. He wants to spread Christmas cheer and help people that need food, clothes, and toys for Christmas. Realizing that this is not some cute fluke and that he was seriously wanting to do this, his father and I felt inspired by this and decided that we would help him in his request to spread Christmas cheer while raising money for families in need.  Read more…



  • LETTERS / Support LOCAL Businesses Nov. 30 on Small Business Saturday

    November 19, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY GREGG THOMPSON / Dear Editor, I’m no Scrooge, but I usually don’t like Christmas shopping. I love buying things for people, but I don’t like the crowds or the lines or the generic merchandise they stock at the chain stores. That’s why I like Small Business Saturday. Small Business Saturday, the Saturday after Thanksgiving, is the opposite of Black Friday. Black Friday, of course, is the unofficial start of the holiday season, although it seems like the Black Friday sales started the second the last trick-or-treater left the porch. Black Friday is all about moving merchandise. Stores open early and close late. People fight crowds and stand in line to save a few bucks on slow cookers and smart TVs. Black Friday is noisy and stressful. Small Business Saturday, on the other hand, is about supporting your friends and neighbors. It’s about buying gifts and enjoying meals who can’t get from one of the national chains.  Read more…



  • LETTERS / Why You’ll Lose at the Hemp Game – An Opinion Piece for Small Farmers in NC

    October 29, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY SERA DEVA / Dear Editor, This is a plea for my friends and neighbors who are small-scale farmers — the people who I feel are doing the most important job on the planet. Please don’t fall for the hemp game! You’ll lose. Here’s why. I fell in love with small-scale agriculture eleven years ago as a result of my involvement with the marijuana industry in Oregon and California. “The industry” was how many of us farming and food students out West made our real (albeit, seasonal) money and lived our lives as fluidly as we did. There were generations that this was true for; mine was probably the last. I want to preface the body of this work by saying that I know that hemp (grown for cannabidiol or CBD flower in this context, a non-intoxicating substance that is known for its medicinal properties) and marijuana (grown for tetrahydrocannabinol or THC, the compound that causes intoxication in medical and recreational cannabis) are two different crops entirely, with different legal statuses and histories that vary across state lines.   Read more…



  • LETTERS / Watauga Riverkeeper Response to “Valle Crucis in Jeopardy” October 11, 2019

    October 11, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY ANDY HILL / Dear Editor, In a recent letter to the editor (“Valle Crucis in Jeopardy”, October 11, 2019), Bill Pressly, stated that the Watauga County Board of Education does not have the support of the Watauga Riverkeeper for the construction of an elementary school at the Hodges site in Valle Crucis. I think it is important to clarify for your readers that it is not the role of the Watauga Riverkeeper and its host organization, MountainTrue, to take a position for or against the Hodges site.  Our job is to ensure that any project built in the Watauga watershed adheres to Watauga County water standards and all applicable environmental regulations. If the project does move forward, the Watauga Riverkeeper will review the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) to assess stormwater control measures and design, riparian buffer, wastewater treatment plans and more to ensure that any construction does not negatively impact water quality.   Read more…



  • LETTERS / Valle Crucis in Jeopardy

    October 11, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY BILL PRESSLY / Dear Editor, In March the Watauga County Board Of Education (BOE) entered into a contract to purchase 14.4 acres (the Hodges site) for 1.105 million dollars as a possible site for a new Valle Crucis School grades 1-8. They are offering to pay 2-3 times the market value of that land. 13 of the 14.4 acres are designated Special Hazard Flood Area and thus requires mitigation in order to build. Much of the reason that a new school is needed is due to flooding of the current school. It makes no sense to spend 35 million dollars to build a new school on a property with a high potential of flooding. The Board of Education has disregarded the State recommendation that calls for a school of that size to be built on a minimum of 25 acres.  Read more…



  • LETTERS / We See Growth at Any Cost Without Regard to What We Call Infrastructure

    October 11, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY CRAIG DUDLEY / Dear Editor, In the opinions I’ve sent to the local ‘news’ outlets over the years, I’ve avoided speaking of ‘local’ politics having learned in West Virginia how convoluted that topic can be, but some things are so obvious that even Ray Charles could see them. They paved paradise and put up a parking lot, is how the song goes, and when you look around Boone, you can see the song’s message clearly displayed in the last twenty years. Frequently Boone is a parking lot, and occasionally a flood zone, all of which has been shaped by those who tell us they work for us. Every day you see more large building projects with no place to put the rising numbers of vehicles. Your daily pursuit of happiness is markedly slowed for the profit of a few, enabled by ‘our’ government. Read more…



  • LETTERS / The Current Proposed Building Site for Valle Crucis School Needs to be Reexamined

    October 1, 2019 Letters to the Editor. By Sally Pressly Ballmer / Dear Editor, I am writing in protest of the proposed new school construction site in Valle Crucis, NC on the Hodges Farm property on Broadstone Road. My parents moved to Valle Crucis in 1984 and purchased a dilapidated homestead that they then restored to historic and architectural preservation guidelines and opened the Mast Farm Inn in 1985.  Serving hundreds of dining and lodging guests each year, the Mast Farm Inn, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, became known as a place of refuge and nostalgia for a simpler time, when food prepared was grown in the garden and air conditioning was a cool breeze through an open window.On October 1 at 6:00pm at the Methodist Church in Valle Crucis, the Valle Crucis Historic District Commission will meet to discuss the changing of commission guidelines, unprecedented by any other construction. The meeting is open to the public. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Before People had an Easy Way to See Video Footage of Police Murders

    October 1, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY CRAIG DUDLEY / Dear Editor, “We have come to be one of the worst ruled, one of the most completely controlled and dominated, governments in the civilized world—no longer a government by free opinion, no longer a government by conviction and the vote of the majority, but a government by the opinion and the duress of small groups of dominant men.”   Woodrow Wilson We’re secretly one of the most peaceful cultures on the planet. We voted for Bush, because he promised us a non-interventionist foreign policy. Obama promised to bring the troops home from the Bush wars. Trump promised to end foreign adventures. We’ve been voting for peace for years, and all we get is war. American democracy doesn’t care what you want and is never accountable. The state always gets its way. So when ‘our’ government wants a war, it will happen. ‘Our’ government works to reduce support for citizens at home so it can war on foreign citizens. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Some of the Issues to Consider Regarding the Proposed Valle Crucis School Site

    September 23, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY BILL PRESSLY / Dear Editor, I’ve lived in Valle Crucis on property adjacent to the Proposed Hodges site for 35 years. As a long term resident I have numerous concerns about the the proposed site for a new Valle Crucis School. Of primary concern is increased impervious surface area due to construction of the building, parking lots and driveways, and paved playgrounds . Rainwater can no longer be absorbed into the soil. This will lead to greater runoff at higher velocity, and flood potential on surrounding property and properties downstream, most notably the Valle Crucis Park. Runoff may also carry more pollutants to the small trout stream that bisects the property and also the Watauga River. There is also potential impact on the groundwater table and well water quality. Also of great concern is a new sewer system and water treatment facilities required to service 425 + people and the effluent being released into the flood zone and watershed. There is already a system in place on the current site. Read more…



  • LETTERS / It’s Our Money, Isn’t It? Flawed Appraisal of Hodges School Site

    September 23, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY LYLE SCHOENFELDT / Dear Editor, Respondents to ValleCrucis.net indicate a strong preference for the proposed Valle Crucis School to be in Valle Crucis but have serious concern for the $1.1 million tax payer dollars being offered for the Hodges property as the proposed site. This was also a concern mentioned in the public hearing on Sept 3. The more than $78,000/acre for undeveloped land, 90% of which is in the flood plain, is an eye opener for those familiar with land values in the Valle. The appraisal for this land was equal to the $1.1 million offered for purchase but close examination of the appraisal shows serious flaws. Suffice it to say with more reasonable comparables a generous valuation of the Hodges property would have been $400,000, about 36% of the $1.1 million offered. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Last Year I Was Assaulted by a Patient While Working in the Hospital

    September 23, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY BILL MOORE / Dear Editor, I am an Emergency Department Registered Nurse and NC certified Paramedic. In October of 2018, while at work in the ED, I was violently and viciously attacked and physically assaulted by an Emergency Department patient who repeatedly tried to punch me in the face. You may say to yourself “that’s terrible but it doesn’t really affect me.” You may think that being attacked by patients is “just part of the job.” Or you probably think this “doesn’t happen often enough to be of any significant consequence.” You would be gravely mistaken on all three counts!. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Rep. Russell’s Statement on State Budget Veto Override Vote on Sept. 11

    September 12, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY REP. RAY RUSSELL / Dear Editor, House Republican Leaders intentionally deceived House Democrats, the press, and the public about a session held at 8:30 am, September 11, 2019, and rammed a vote on the State Budget through the House. At the end of a non-voting session Tuesday night, the House Rules Committee Chairman David Lewis, who presided over the session, told Minority Leader Darren Jackson that no votes would be taken in the 8:30 am session Wednesday. The Minority Leader communicated this information to House Democrats via email. Also, Rep. Lewis texted reporters that there would be no votes in the 8:30 am session Wednesday. (Copies of the text have circulated widely in news reports and social media.) I presume the purpose was to keep reporters from being on the floor to cover what would happen. To add context, the House has scheduled scores of “No Vote Sessions” since January. This is normal operating procedure to dispense with parliamentary procedures that do not require the presence of members. Read more…



  • LETTERS / ValleCrucis.net Respondents Speak Loud and Clear

    September 23, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY LYLE SCHOENFELDT / Dear Editor, Respondents to ValleCrucis.net indicate a strong preference for the proposed Valle Crucis School to be in Valle Crucis but have serious concern for the $1.1 million tax payer dollars being offered for the Hodges property as the proposed site. This was also a concern mentioned in the public hearing on Sept 3. The more than $78,000/acre for undeveloped land, 90% of which is in the flood plain, is an eye opener for those familiar with land values in the Valle. The appraisal for this land was equal to the $1.1 million offered for purchase but close examination of the appraisal shows serious flaws. Suffice it to say with more reasonable comparables a generous valuation of the Hodges property would have been $400,000, about 36% of the $1.1 million offered. Read more…



  • LETTERS / It’s Time Again

    July 25, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY CRAIG DUDLEY / Dear Editor, Fifty years ago Rachael Carson wrote a book that got a lot of attention: Silent Spring. It seems the answer to her these days is: We’re not sure, so why stand in the way of ‘progress’, when concerns are raised about chemical processes being let loose in the world? Who benefits, what’s the blowback, and why aren’t those questions raised as we spread unknown chemical ‘solution’s’ all around us. ‘Our’ president recently signed an executive order letting loose on ‘consumers’ any chemical creation ‘our’ food industry cares to sell in the face of the problems with GMO creations like gluten difficulties and behavioral problems in children, let alone blowback like dying honey bees. Monsanto has been convicted in several courts by juries convinced that roundup causes cancer which hasn’t slowed the worldwide broadcast of those poisons a bit.. Read more…



  • LETTERS / An Open Letter to Rep. Virginia Foxx

    July 17, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY Eric W. Plagg / Dear Rep. Foxx, As one of your constituents and someone whose interests you were elected to serve, I was deeply disappointed to see that you and all but four of your fellow GOP members of the US House voted against House Resolution 489 condemning President Trump’s racist comments directed at Members of Congress. As a reminder, this resolution was in response to tweets by President Trump, wherein he said of four House members who are American citizens and women of color, So interesting to see ‘Progressive’ Democrat Congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe…now loudly and viciously telling the people of the United States…how our government is to be run. Why don’t they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came[?] Then come back and show us how it is done. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Rep. Russell Supports Governor’s Budget Compromise

    July 10, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY Rep. Ray Russell / Dear Editor, On Tuesday, Gov. Roy Cooper released his compromise state budget proposal. It includes healthcare coverage for nearly 500,000 working poor North Carolinians, a larger increase in teacher and state employee pay, more funding for school construction, additional spending for clean air and water, and restored funding for the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). This offer from Gov. Cooper is an investment in our people and our future. We must devote resources to education, healthcare, and protecting the environment. The proposal keeps the corporate and franchise taxes at their current low rate, and retains the General Assembly (GA) plan to increase the standard deduction on state taxes to help working families. The Governor’s plan includes $700 million for the Rainy Day Fund and $110 million for hurricane relief. Read more…



  • LETTERS / People Will Follow

    May 30, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY CRAIG DUDLEY / Dear Editor, Fifty years ago there was a TV episode on ‘outer limits’ called “to serve man”. In it aliens, other planet types, landed and one of the first things they did was present world leaders a book, in their language. They provided earthlings free travel to their planet with extensive marketing about wonders to be found there. Earthlings lined up at the space ships to go. One radical, early on, decided to translate the book presented at the first landing. When most of the earthlings had already departed he discovered that “to serve man” was a cookbook. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Public Hearing on Proposed Rainey Lodge 40 Room Hotel & Restaurant in Downtown Blowing Rock Completed – Tipping Point

    May 20, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY GEORGE WILCOX / Dear Editor, This public hearing was a tipping point for Blowing Rock creating division rather than unity to protect our shared concerns for the future of our community, especially our historic downtown that is our leading economic development asset.   The issues raised during the hearing are not whether the community would benefit from a new hotel, but the polarization created by the developer friendly CUP process which didn’t allow for a full consideration of how the developer, the community, and council could work together for the best outcomes. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Rumors FROM UNDER THE ROCK!

    May 12, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY DAN PHILLIPS / Dear Editor, It’s always fascinating to see what kind of information will sneak out from under a rock.There is a Rumor circulating in Town concerning the Blowing Rock Civic Association. It is FAKE NEWS!The BRCA has not had its Computer Server, (located in George and Betsy’s Garage) hacked by the Russians. NO COLLUSION, NO OBSTRUCTION!!! The thoughts I will share, come from Serving a 4-year sentence on the Town Council, as well as being a merchant and homeowner. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Very Important Decision on Downtown Blowing Rock Development Next Tuesday Night, May 14

    May 9, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY WILLIAM H. CARTER / Dear Editor, A 40 room hotel with restaurant and bar has been proposed for downtown Blowing Rock by a Charlotte developer who previously has developed a Ramada Inn in Dickinson, North Dakota. The proposed hotel, if approved by Blowing Rock Council, will be located on a less than one acre property back of the Speckled Trout restaurant. This is a major decision for Blowing Rock. We urge all interested Blowing Rock citizens to attend next Tuesday’s important council meeting starting at 6:00 P.M. at Town Hall. A hearing on this major matter will resume at Tuesday’s meeting. Any citizen can speak at this hearing after which council will vote to approve or deny the request for a permit for this development. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Considerations on the Plans for the Hwy. 105 Improvements in Boone

    April 30, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY MARK KIRKPATRICK / Dear Editor, Thank you all and  thank DOT for taking full consideration of local suggestions and input. We welcome DOTs visioning for the improvement of Hwy 105. We note that Locals drive these roads every day and have a good feel of Boone traffic flow.   The State and DOT absolutely does a good job. We acknowledge that a good deal of time and energy has gone into the planning done by DOT and the County and the Town for the planned improvements of Hwy 105. In my work I travel to Asheville, Morganton, Banner Elk, Beech Mountain, Linville, Mountain City, Blowing Rock and Jefferson. The roads have gotten and are getting better. Thank you DOT! We seek to provide input to the professionals involved. 1)  As a local and long term user of Poplar Grove South and Hwy 105.  2) As a professional that works and drives regularly the fantastic Hwy 421 to Wilkes; the 321 “on the ground” Super Street concept in Blowing Rock, and Hwy 105, (in much need of improvement) Read more…



  • LETTERS / ‘Our’ Empire Has Been Almost Continually at War Since Plymouth Rock

    March 6, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY CRAIG DUDLEY / Dear Editor, “Why, of course, the people don’t want war. Why would some poor slob on a farm want to risk his life in a war when the best he can get out of it is to come back to his farm in one piece? Naturally the common people don’t want war: neither in Russia, nor in England, nor for that matter in Germany. That is understood. But after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy or a fascist dictatorship or a parliament or a communist dictatorship. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Major Blowing Rock Code Changes Proposed to Promote Downtown Change – Public Hearing Set for February 12, 2019

    January 15, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY WILLIAM H. CARTER / Dear Editor, The Blowing Rock Town Council has set a public hearing Tuesday February 12, 2019 at 6:00 P.M. at Town Hall for consideration of major changes in long standing town codes governing downtown development. Community surveys of residents, property owners and taxpayers have repeatedly listed their top priority to be as spelled out in the Town’s Comprehensive Plan  “…to ensure that the Town’s unique character and quality of life are not compromised.” The question is: How will the major proposed changes, if approved, impact this top resident priority? More information on the proposed code changes is available on our Blowing Rock Civic Association website www.brcivic.com. We urge all interested citizens to attend the February 12, 2019 public hearing and to express your important opinion on these proposed code changes. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Israel These Days

    January 2, 2019 Letters to the Editor. BY CRAIG DUDLEY / Dear Editor, Once, an anti-Semite was someone who hated Jews but today it’s pasted on anyone who speaks truth about Israel, especially its policies involving the Palestinians. Virtually nothing is left of Palestine except the Gaza ghetto, the modern equivalent of the Warsaw Ghetto: Moving anyone or anything in and out is controlled by Israel. In its effort to control the justification of their crimes, the Israel Lobby has made “anti-Semite” into an honorable position. We’re all potential Palestinians. ‘Consumers’ don’t know that Israel’s government confiscates entire Palestinian villages and demolishes Palestinian homes to build homes for Israelis. Stories are planted in your head by ‘our free press’ and schools that make no room for exploration of other possibilities filling you with that programming allowing no conflicting information access. Read more…



  • LETTERS / There Are Many Questions That This New Information Raises

    November 20, 2018 Letters to the Editor. BY FRANK PACKARD / Dear Editor, So, on 11/15/18 the HCP staff wrote a news article basically recapping the Boone Town Council meeting from October 18, 2018 in regards to the town’s water intake update. In what world is it news to report on a meeting nearly 30 days after the meeting actually took place?  More newsworthy reporting would have been to report on the town council meeting that took place on night of 11/15/18.  Did anyone from the HCP press attend that meeting or even watch the video of the meeting.  If you did,  then you know that the info reported from the 10/18 meeting was old news.  Read more…



  • LETTERS / On Possible Parking Solutions for ASU and Downtown Boone

    November 16, 2018 Letters to the Editor. BY KAREN CARTER / Dear Editor, Well, the decisions of the past are coming back to haunt Boone town residents and their civic and business organizations.   The decision to allow transient college students to vote in local elections and even run for local offices had some serious repercussions for longtime townspeople as well as rural communities.  Also, local people soon realized that college officials and professors would be vying to run the town, and also, try to influence the entire county, if not run the county, too. Read more…



  • LETTERS / Magic Moment as The Choir of St. Mary of the Hills Episcopal Church Performed at BRAHM

    November 9, 2018 Letters to the Editor. BY GEORGE WILCOX / Dear Editor, Last Sunday a truly magic moment was created in Blowing Rock by a special program presented by two world class organizations The Blowing Rock Art and History Museum and The Choir of St. Mary of the Hills Episcopal Church of Blowing Rock. The program of inspirational words and music with the theme Meditations on Mortality was uniquely touching. The St. Mary’s Choir very ably led by organist and choirmaster Dr. Jim Bumgardner gave a performance of a quality normally expected only in such exalted venues as St. Paul’s Cathedral, London, or King’s College Chapel, Cambridge. The museum with the leadership of Executive Director Lee Carol Giduz provided a beautiful site with great acoustics for an outstanding concert. Congratulations and thanks to all of those talented individuals in the choir and at the museum who do so much to make Blowing Rock such a wonderful town.  Read more…



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