• A First Time Visit To Blue Deer Cookies; A Review by Asha Batchelor


    October 8, 2019. As I walked into the Blue Deer Cookies location I instantly saw a silver camper!  Which I thought was cool because a camper is so unique, hotdog stands have a cart, restaurants or stores are inside in a building, but Blue Deer Cookies is located in a camper! So, this was my first time being there but really I regret not going there before! Its was astonishing! The taste the smells the presentation! The food is definitely Instagram worthy! So I had an interview with the owner! During the interview with Justin Northern he answered some of my questions I was wondering! By Asha Batchelor / Read more…



  • Beech Mountain Club Announces Non-Property Owner (NPO) Membership Now Available

    October 8, 2019 After fifty (50) years of operation with property ownership as a requirement for Club membership, the Beech Mountain Club is now offering a limited number of memberships to Non-Property Owners (NPO). The Beech Mountain Club is a private, social club located on beautiful Beech Mountain, North Carolina. Our 1,250 member families enjoy cool summer temperatures, outstanding amenities, state-of-the-art facilities and equipment, winter sports opportunities and the services of a professional staff dedicated to providing our members with all the activities and programs you would expect at a mountain retreat.. / Read more…



  • Boone Drug Celebrates 100th Anniversary on Saturday and Unveils Latest Store Logo


    October 7, 2019. The Town of Boone gathered together on Saturday for a special 100th-anniversary celebration of one of the longest-standing businesses in Boone. Dr. George Kelly Moose founded Boone Drug, which first opened its doors in 1919. Since then, the family-owned business has changed hands a few times over the years. One thing has never changed, and that is the commitment to the community and its people. The Richardson, Miller, Furman and Stacy families have all had an owner’s stake in the company at one point or another, but as owner and president Corey Furman said during the event on Saturday at the Jones House, Boone Drug has meant just as much to the community as it has its owners. By Nathan Ham / Read more…



  • Small Earthquake Hits the High Country Just South of Blowing Rock Early Sunday


    October 7, 2019. A small earthquake with a magnitude of 2.1 was reported approximately 14 kilometers (8.7 miles) south of Blowing Rock at 12:55 a.m. Sunday. The report put together by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) that the quake occurred at an approximate depth of 4.8 kilometers (2.99 miles) below the earth’s surface in Caldwell County. The USGS interactive map has an earthquake located in an area known as Winding Stairs Mountain, roughly three miles off of U.S. Highway 321 near the Happy Valley community. According to the USGS, earthquakes under a magnitude of 2.5 are rarely felt at the surface. The report for this quake has one resident that reported feeling it. By Nathan Ham / Read more…



  • High Country Toastmasters Celebrated Their 10th Anniversary in Boone with a Special Gathering


    October 7, 2019. On October 1st, High Country Toastmasters celebrated their 10th anniversary in Boone with a special gathering, and featured actor David Andrews as a guest speaker for the event. At a Toastmasters event, members learn by speaking to groups and working with others in a supportive environment. An average High Country Toastmasters club is made of around nine to twelve people who all meet once a week for just over an hour. Each meeting gives members the chance to: learn how to plan and conduct business meetings, give one-to-two-minute impromptu speeches about various topics, present prepared speeches, offer constructive evaluation, and interaction with a flexible learning program which gives you the option to pick which skills you want to focus on. By Colby Gable / Read more…



  • October Exhibits at Blue Ridge ArtSpace Feature the Work of Earl Davis and John Audish; 2nd Saturday Celebration to be Held October 12


    October 7, 2019. The Blue Ridge ArtSpace, a community arts hub filled with four galleries, classrooms, and a Gift Shop, is the home of the Watauga County Arts Council. During the month of October, the Main Gallery features the work of Earl Davis and John Audish. As an artist, Davis enjoys oil painting, focusing mostly on landscapes with a sprinkling of portraits and impressionism thrown in. However he also enjoys lamp working (glassblowing), piloting aircrafts, writing books, and still continues as an interim pastor after having retired from his career as a minister. He recently shared his work through the Artist in Residence Program at the Edgewood Cottage in Blowing Rock. John Audish has always loved to draw. During his military service, his quick sketch of General Westmoreland became the general’s favorite. After a military career, John became a businessman and lives in Hickory, NC with his wife Sandy. John’s work in watercolor and oil is found throughout the Carolinas.
    / Read more…



  • 64th Annual Farm City Banquet Happening November 7

    October 7, 2019 The 64th Annual Farm City Banquet will be held on Thursday, November 7 at 6 p.m. at the Boone United Methodist Church located on New Market Boulevard in Boone. The theme for this year’s banquet is “High Country Grown: Who’s Your Farmer?” to celebrate Watauga County’s farmers and the community and town folk that support them. The banquet and awards ceremony is organized annually by the Town of Boone, ASU, and N.C. Cooperative Extension of Watauga County. This year, the program includes special guest Sheri Castle, award-winning professional food writer, cook and storyteller who hails from Watauga County, and music from Will Willis, a local singer & songwriter. Following a dinner supplied from local farms, awards will be presented to those in the farming, civic, and business community who have made significant contributions to the agricultural economy. Commodity groups also will award their respective producers of the year, and the Watauga Soil and Water District will present the Farm Family of the Year award. The Boone Chamber of Commerce will present the “Tuckwiller Award” to recognize achievements in Community Development in memory of the late Lake Ernest Tuckwiller, past Watauga County Farm Agent. / Read more…



  • Holiday Originals Artists Wanted for Blue Ridge ArtSpace; Application Deadline is October 19


    October 7, 2019. Believe it or not, the holidays are right around the corner with less than 80 days remaining until Christmas! To help local shoppers find unique, locally crafted, and unforgettable gifts, the Blue Ridge ArtSpace and Watauga County Arts Council are once again presenting Holiday Originals. They are seeking to add even more new work to this sales event and are inviting interested local artists to apply. The show will officially open on November 9th and will run until December 21st. The application deadline for artists who would like to participate in the event is October 19th. No participation fee is required, but participating artists must be (or become) current members of the Blue Ridge Art Space/Watauga County Arts Council. Membership allows artists to participate in this and many other offerings throughout the year and begins at $35. Commission rates range from 25% to 40% depending upon the level of volunteer participation of the artist. / Read more…



  • Avery High School Students Volunteer and Take College Tours with Mountain Alliance


    October 4, 2019. A select group of eight Avery County High School students recently had the opportunity to both prepare for their academic future and lend a helping hand. Through the non-profit organization Mountain Alliance, eight students from the high school toured N.C. State University, UNC-Wilmington and Campbell University, and spent time volunteering in Wilmington with the Wilmington Area Rebuilding Ministry (WARM). “We are proud to offer this trip to students as we feel that touring colleges allows students the opportunity to envision themselves on a college campus,” said Brittany Starbuck, the Program Director at Mountain Alliance. “We try to include colleges that have differences so students can compare and think about what type of college they would be most happy and successful at.”  By Nathan Ham / Read more…



  • Appalachian Regional Healthcare System Announces Changes for The Foley Center at Chestnut Ridge


    October 4, 2019. Appalachian Regional Healthcare System (ARHS) is pleased to announce that effective October 1, 2019, Liberty Healthcare Properties of Watauga County, LLC and Liberty Commons Nursing and Rehabilitation Center of Watauga County, LLC (Liberty) became the owner/operator, respectively, of the Foley Center at Chestnut Ridge, located in Blowing Rock, N.C.  ARHS President and CEO Chuck Mantooth commented on the ownership change by saying, “the future of healthcare delivery, particularly in rural areas will be about leveraging partnerships. Over the last year, as we worked with Liberty to plan the development of a senior living campus at Chestnut Ridge it became clear that the skilled nursing and assisted living services should be integrated within their care continuum. Liberty can now take the next steps forward to evaluate the nature of and develop the retirement community that we have been working toward for the last 10 years.”  / Read more…



  • Appalachian Theatre Sets Opening Date and Schedule of Events; Eight Year, $10 Million Effort Comes to Fruition with Opening on October 14


    October 4, 2019. The leadership team at the Appalachian Theatre of the High Country (ATHC) announced today that the final phase of construction has been completed and that the newly-renovated 1938 landmark will begin operations this month. The first performance will take place at 7 p.m. on Monday, October 14, 2019 when John McEuen, founder of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band will be joined by his current band, The String Wizards, for a concert titled, “Will The Circle Be Unbroken.” “The name of that event is fortuitous since we’ve now come full circle with this project,” said John Cooper, chair of the theatre’s board of trustees. “What began as the ‘Save The Appalachian Theatre’ task force in December 2011 has grown to involve over 500 volunteers and thousands of community stakeholders, all of whom have given generously of their time, talent, and resources to make this dream become a reality.” / Read more…



  • Apples, Apples and More Apples: Brushy Mountain Apple Festival Happening this Saturday


    October 3, 2019. The long-running Brushy Mountain Apple Festival in downtown North Wilkesboro is sure to bring a big crowd out on the street this Saturday for the 42nd straight year. The first Saturday in October always marks the special occasion each year. While the weather can be unpredictable this time of year, this weekend’s edition of the festival looks like a warm, clear day in the foothills. Events get underway on Friday evening with the “Apple Jam” music show that takes place at the corner of 10th and Main in downtown North Wilkesboro. Music starts at 6 p.m. and will continue until 9 p.m. Be sure to bring your favorite lawn chair and prepare to relax and enjoy some great music as the sun goes down. The main event fires up at 8 a.m. Saturday morning with what is considered one of the largest one-day arts and crafts festivals in the southern United States with an average of over 160,000 people coming to the festival. The event also sets up as a major fundraiser for a lot of social organizations, church groups and non-profit organizations.  By Nathan Ham / Read more…



  • Boone and Blowing Rock Featured in New York Times Article on Thursday


    October 3, 2019. Areas around Boone and Blowing Rock received from national publicity on Thursday morning when an article about Boone appeared online in the New York Times. The story written by Paige McClanahan chronicles her experience spending a weekend in the High Country. During her first day in Boone on a Friday, she detailed a hike at Elk Knob State Park and dinner, drinks and music at Lost Province Brewing in downtown Boone. The next day, Paige spent the first part of the day checking out what Boone has to offer. She talked about her breakfast at Stick Boy Bread Company, spending time in downtown Boone and eating lunch at the F.A.R.M. Café. After that, she headed to Blowing Rock where she stopped in at The Blowing Rock tourist attraction, the Blowing Rock Art and History Museum, took a stroll through downtown Blowing Rock and finally capped off the evening with dinner at The Best Cellar.  By Nathan Ham / Read more…



  • Blowing Rock Civic Association Hosting Candidate Roundtable October 3

    October 3, 2019 Town residents in Blowing Rock are gearing up for the upcoming November election that will have two town council seats and the mayoral seat up for election on November 5. The Blowing Rock Civic Association will be hosting a special candidate roundtable on Thursday, October 3 at the Blowing Rock American Legion Building. Social time begins at 6:15 p.m. with the roundtable beginning at 7 p.m. The roundtable will be focused on issues that surround Blowing Rock town residents and will also allow for questions from audience members in attendance. By Nathan Ham / Read more…



  • Boone Sets Another Record High on Wednesday; 2020 Ray’s Weather Blue Ridge Parkway Calendar Now Available


    October 2, 2019. Boone set yet another record high this fall season, reaching 82.2 degrees at 4:15 p.m. on Wednesday afternoon according to data provided by Ray’s Weather Center. That temperature easily beat the previous record of 79 degrees that was set in 1951. Other areas across the country reached temperatures even higher than Boone. The town of Seven Devils checked in with a high temperature of 83.9 degrees at 3:52 p.m., Zionville’s temperature made it up to 84.8 degrees at 4:01 p.m., Valle Crucis got to 85.7 degrees at 5:01 p.m. and Warrensville over in neighboring Ashe County had the highest temperature in the area with 86.7 degrees at 3:50 p.m. West Jefferson peaked at 85.1 degrees, Jefferson got to 84.6 degrees, Newland hit 84.1 degrees, Linville reached 82.1 degrees, Blowing Rock reached a high of 80.9 degrees, Banner Elk got to 80.7 degrees, Sugar Mountain nearly reached 80 with a high of 79.1 degrees and Beech Mountain had a high of 74.8 degrees.  By Nathan Ham / Read more…



  • Weekly Crime Reports: Activity and Arrests in Boone and Watauga County, September 16 – September 30

    October 2, 2019. Looking to stay up-to-date on what’s happening in your neighborhood? Want to keep an eye on criminal activity in your area? Take a look at these recent incident and arrest reports from the Watauga County Sheriff’s Office and the Boone Police Department. Read more…
    Compiled by Nathan Ham



  • Saloon Studios Provides State-of-the-Art Live Music Performances and Studio Production in an Old West Environment; Atlanta Rhythm Section Performs October 5


    October 2, 2019. Tucked away on 180 acres of Mt. Jefferson, just south of West Jefferson, Saloon Studios is at the heart of a mid 19th-century Old West town replica surrounded by such buildings as a sheriff’s office, undertaker, post office, blacksmith, stables, cantina, and a general store. However, the saloon not just a replica of a western-style saloon; the location also doubles as a live performance stage and recording venue with state-of-the-art recording equipment, technology, and sound engineering in an intimate, 100-seat setting. Rock n’ Roll legends as well as up-and-coming acts are invited to the live stage to showcase their greatest hits; rock n’ roll hall of famers such as Dave Mason of Traffic and Steve Cropper of “STAX” Records, Foghat, Molly Hatchet and more have performed at Saloon Studios. By Joe Johnson / Read more…



  • Watauga Riverkeeper to Hold ‘Live Staking’ Volunteer Days to Stabilize Riverbanks, Prevent Erosion


    October 2, 2019. Watauga Riverkeeper Andy Hill is looking for some hearty volunteers to help stabilize local riverbanks and prevent erosion in the Watauga River Basin. The Watauga Riverkeeper will hold a series of “Paddle-n-Plant Days” where volunteers will plant “live stakes” while wading and/or paddling in the Watauga. A live stake is a cutting from a tree species like silky dogwood, black willow, or elderberry that can be planted along riverbanks and eventually reduces sediment erosion. “These stakes will grow into trees that will stabilize the sides of the rivers and creeks where we plant them and will reduce the overall amount of sediment getting into the river,” Hill explains. Sediment is one of the worst forms of river pollution, as it clogs aquatic habitats, increases water temperature (which is harmful to trout and other species) and transports toxic substances. When spring comes, the stakes’ nodes that were planted underground will sprout roots, helping to hold the riverbank in place.  / Read more…



  • Boone Drug to Celebrate 100th Anniversary Oct. 5 at Jones House from 10:00 to 3:00


    October 2, 2019. The community is invited to join Boone Drug at its official 100-year anniversary celebration on Saturday, Oct. 5 from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. at the Jones House in Boone. Refreshments, including birthday cake, will be served along with music, games and giveaways. In keeping with the company’s ongoing efforts to help meet the medical needs of the community, the celebration will also feature a wellness event to include blood pressure monitoring, patient and self-examination education. Flu shots and wellness booths from other local businesses will be available, as well. By Sherrie Norris / Read more…



  • Sherrie Norris Lovin’ Spoonful Cooking Column: The Great Pumpkin Officially Arrives


    October 2, 2019. Despite the summer-like temperatures we’re still experiencing even in October, roadside pumpkin stands popping up around The High Country are serving as a huge indicator that fall has arrived. Hopefully, by the weekend, we’re told, it will also begin to “feel” like fall. And, yes, it won’t be long until warmer days will be but a fleeting memory and we’ll be wishing they were back! It’s all about the pumpkin now, as we see in so many products that are including it as a key ingredient, so let’s enjoy a little trivia and move on to the good stuff: While easily grown in these parts, pumpkins are believed to have been first cultivated in Central America. History tells us that Spanish and Portuguese explorers carried pumpkin seeds back to Europe in the 14th century. In North America, native Americans grew pumpkins for food long before the first Europeans arrived on the continent in the 1600s. The vivid orange color of pumpkin indicates a high content of carotene pigments such as lutein, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene (which turns in to vitamin A in the body). Using pumpkins as lanterns at Halloween is based on an ancient Celtic custom brought to America by Irish immigrants. By Sherrie Norris / Read more…



  • Today’s Email Announcements

    What’s going on in your community? Here’s a brief update on the emails we received today. Check back each day for an updated list of events going on in the area. As always, please feel free to email us about your event or update.

    Read more…
    Compiled by Nathan Ham



  • Lees-McRae College Theatre Arts Brings Young Frankenstein to Life October 3–6


    October 1, 2019. Just in time for the spooky Halloween season and Homecoming 2019, the Lees-McRae Theatre Arts program will breathe life into one of our most well-known horror legends—with a Mel Brooks twist—as it presents the musical Young Frankenstein October 3–6. Based on the 1974 movie of the same title, Young Frankenstein tells the story of Dr. Frederick Frankenstein (he prefers to pronounce it “Fronkensteen”) who is the grandson of the infamous Dr. Victor Frankenstein, maker of monsters. The young doctor may have inherited the family name and castle in Transylvania, but he did not inherit his family’s penchant for digging up bodies and reanimating them with a lightning storm.  / Read more…



  • Sen. Jeff Jackson Will Headline Watauga Dems Fall Rally on Oct. 5


    October 1, 2019. The Appalachian State College Democrats will once again host the Fall Rally of the Watauga County Democratic Party on Saturday, October 5, starting at 5:30 p.m. in the Roess Dining Hall on the ASU campus. The Rivers Street Parking Deck will offer free parking that evening, with easy access to the Rally site via the elevated pedestrian crosswalk above Rivers St. Senator Jeff Jackson of Mecklenburg County will be the keynote speaker. Sen. Jackson has become during his tenure in the Senate one of the leaders of the Democratic resistance and was prominently promoted as a logical recruit to run for the US Senate against Sen. Thom Tillis. Jackson, the youngest member of the NC Senate, joined the Army after 9/11 and was deployed to Afghanistan. He remains to this day in the JAG Corps with the Army National Guard, having earned his law degree after Afghanistan.  / Read more…



  • Abigail Swanger Chosen to Elite Class of 15 ‘Afterschool Ambassadors’ in America


    October 1, 2019. Abigail Swanger is an interesting and highly-accomplished individual with a tremendously deep passion to help and be a mentor and positive influence on children. And her honorable efforts are being recognized across the nation—literally. The Afterschool Alliance has announced that Swanger, Family and Community Coordinator at WAMY’s Community Kids Afterschool Program for Avery County, has been selected to serve as an Afterschool Ambassador for the Afterschool Alliance in 2019-2020. Swanger, a Greenville, SC native and Appalachian State University graduate, is one of just 15 leaders in the United States chosen for this prestigious honor this year. Ambassadors will continue their work supporting local afterschool programs while serving the one-year Afterschool Ambassador term, organizing public events, communicating with policymakers and community leaders and in various other ways increasing awareness and support for afterschool and summer learning programs. By Tim Gardner / Read more…



  • Avery Native and Former McDowell County Sheriff Dudley Greene a Candidate for State House of Representatives


    October 1, 2019. Avery County native and former McDowell County Sheriff Dudley Greene announced in a press release Wednesday, Sept. 25, that he will file as a Republican candidate in next year’s election for the North Carolina House of Representatives. Greene is 56 years old. He will be seeking the seat currently occupied but being vacated by his fellow-Avery native, Josh Dobson, representing the 85th District consisting of Avery, Mitchell and McDowell counties. Dobson is not seeking re-election to the post and has announced he is a candidate for North Carolina Labor Commissioner in 2020. Greene is a 1981 graduate of Avery County High School and a 1985 graduate of Mayland Community College, where he earned a degree in criminal justice. By Tim Gardner / Read more…



  • An Evening of Hope: Large Crowd Attends Fundraising Banquet for Local Pregnancy Center


    October 1, 2019. Approximately 250 people gathered on September 19 to celebrate the success of Hope Pregnancy Center, a local nonprofit organization that has a proven track record of changing lives. The 29th annual fundraising banquet was held at the Harvest House Performing Arts Venue in Boone with center staff and clients sharing testimonials about the services they provide and receive. By Sherrie Norris / Read more…



  • Armando Iannucci’s ‘David Copperfield’ Leads 2019 British freelance Film Awards Nominations

    The fresh retelling of Charles Dickens’ classic landed 11 nominations, with ‘Wild Rose’ scoring 10. Armando Iannucci’s fresh retelling of the Charles Dickens classic The Personal History of David Copperfield leads the pack of nominees for this year’s British Independent Film Awards.  Unveiled on Wednesday by British actors Naomi Ackie and Joe Cole, the crowd pleaser landed 11 nominations, including for best British independent film, best actor for Dev Patel and in best supporting categories Read more…



  • Town of Boone Enters into Agreement to Purchase 2.95 Acres of Land Adjacent to Daniel Boone Park


    September 30, 2019. At the 2019 Town Council retreat, the Boone Town Council identified as a main priority the need for expanding and protection of parking in the Town of Boone. To support this goal the Town of Boone has agreed to purchase 2.95 acres adjacent t the existing Daniel Boone Park located at Hone in the West Drive from the Winkler family. The heavily wooded property is located adjacent to the Strawberry Hill Arboretum in Daniel Boone Park. The total purchase price approved by the Town Council is $200,000. The property will be combined with the existing Daniel Boone Park property, to expand the park to 34.20 acres. / Read more…



  • Dry and Unseasonably Warm Weather Will Continue into October; More Record-Breaking High Temperatures Possible

    September 30, 2019. If you didn’t know that the season had changed on the calendar, you would have no idea that autumn has arrived. More very dry and very warm weather is on top as the first week of October begins on Tuesday. According to Monday’s weather forecast from Ray’s Weather Center, there will be a chance to set some more record high temperatures this week, particularly on Wednesday and Thursday. High temperatures are predicted to reach the upper 70s on Tuesday and the lower to mid-80s on Wednesday and Thursday. The current record high for October 1 was 81 degrees set in 1933. The record for October 2 is 79 degrees set in 1951 and the record for October 3 is 81 degrees set in 1954. Both of those last two records are certainly in jeopardy if the current forecast holds out. By Nathan Ham / Read more…



  • Two New Street Names Coming To Boone: One Honoring a Slave and One for Martin Luther King


    September 30, 2019. On October 1, two streets will have new names. The front portion of Hunting Hills Lane, from State Farm Road to the bridge, will be called Martin Luther King, Jr. Street, and the entirety of S. Water Street will be called Burrell Street. This decision came on August 15 at a Boone Town Council meeting, to honor Dr. King’s legacy, as well as the legacy of a lesser-known figure of Boone’s history: a slave named Burrell. Sam Furgiuele, a lawyer and member of the Town Council, pushed especially for the latter. Sam explained in an email, “It’s not surprising that there is little information about Burrell on the internet, since with few exceptions, American history hasn’t exactly honored the achievements of many slaves. The story is compelling for several reasons and has what I consider enormous local significance.” By Adam Estabrook / Read more…



  • Watauga County Schools Named Accomplished District by National Board for Professional Teaching Standards


    September 30, 2019 Watauga County Schools has been named an Accomplished District by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, a national non-profit organization that certifies teachers based on a rigorous set of evaluations and standards. The honor is given to school districts in which 20 percent or more of teachers have achieved National Board certification. Watauga County is one of just 81 school districts across the nation that were awarded the Accomplished District designation. To a achieve a National Board certification, teachers must prepare a series of essays, presentations and videos that demonstrate their content knowledge, differentiation in instruction, command of teaching practices and learning environment, and their abilities as an effective and reflective practitioner of teaching. / Read more…



  • Middle Fork Greenway Round Up Goal Reaches $182,000; Challenge Donor Match Calls to Fill the Gap to Reach $200,000


    September 30, 2019 An unprecedented number of businesses collaborated to raise money in support of constructing the next section of greenway that will eventually connect the towns of Blowing Rock and Boone with a pedestrian and bicycle-friendly alternate route that benefits residents, visitors, and businesses of Watauga County. The Round Up for the Middle Fork Greenway (MFG) rallied support with its 2nd community-wide fundraiser. One hundred and thirty Watauga County businesses participated by asking their customers to round up their purchase to the next dollar or give to a donation jar. Some businesses gave a percentage of their sales for the month or gave a one-time donation. The collective effort raised $182,000 and counting. There were also over 50 individuals that donated. / Read more…



  • From Foundation to Roof: ‘App Builds a Home’ Takes Shape During Blitz Build


    September 30, 2019 A chorus of hammers was set in motion over the last weekend, when more than 200 volunteers gathered at the App Builds a Home (ABAH) job site in Boone’s GreenWood subdivision to begin constructing a home in partnership with Watauga County Habitat for Humanity. Since last fall, Appalachian State University’s ABAH team has been raising money and volunteer support for the project, which began to take physical shape during a “blitz build” on Sept. 21 and 22. Student, staff, faculty and alumni volunteers from Appalachian worked alongside the Habitat for Humanity Road Trip Crazies — a team of 50 Habitat enthusiasts who travel the country to kick-start home builds. / Read more…



  • Fall Color Guy Gives Latest Update on Leaf Colors as Drought Continues But Conditions Improve


    September 30, 2019. Around this time of year when the color starts to change in the trees, we pay attention. Most of us watch the leaves turn in real time. Others work to skip ahead, to predict when exactly we’ll see our fall colors, how vividly, and how long. One such person is Dr. Howard Neufeld, a professor of biology at Appalachian State University. Better known by the public as the Fall Color Guy, he monitors the weather, temperature, and color activity here in the mountains, and makes predictions accordingly. In the recent weeks, the Fall Color Guy has paid visits to the mountains, reporting his thoughts on the colors developing in the trees. These visits are documented at the Fall Color Report, with pictures and additional comments posted to his Facebook. By Adam Estabrook / Read more…



  • TODAY: N.C. Attorney General Rufus Edmisten “Coming Home” to Boone for Book Launch at 5 p.m.


    October 4, 2019. He has been described as perhaps one of the country’s most colorful politicians in the last half-century — and he’s coming home to Boone to launch his autobiography. Thanks to the efforts of the Watauga County Historical Society and The Jones House Cultural and Community Center, native son Rufus Edmisten returns for a special event at which he’s looking forward to reminiscing with old friends, meeting new ones and signing his recently released autobiography, “That’s Rufus: A Memoir of Tarheel Politics.” The event gets under way at the Jones House on Friday, October 4 beginning at 5 30 p.m., just one of several efforts spearheaded by the Watauga County Historical Society in an effort to preserve local history and celebrate the people who made it what it is. “We are delighted to be hosting Rufus Edmisten as he comes home to Boone,” said Bettie Bond, president of the WCHS. By Sherrie Norris / Read more…



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