NC Pesticide Board Approves Several Pesticide Settlement Cases, One in Avery

Published Wednesday, January 13, 2016 at 9:40 am

The N.C. Pesticide Board recently approved the following settlement agreements for individuals and companies in Avery, Columbus, Craven, Cumberland, Currituck, Duplin and Greene counties, Mechanicsville, Va., Culpepper, Va., and Aynor, S.C.

William P. Wise, with Fraser Grover Tree Farm in Plumtree, agreed to pay $700 for damage caused to a neighboring property by drift from a pesticide application. N.C. Pesticide law states no person should apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors result in adverse effects.

Jerry T. Elliott and Elliott Enterprises of NC Inc. in Dover agreed to pay $1,400 for selling restricted-use pesticides without a pesticide dealer license. Elliot is now licensed as a pesticide dealer. N.C. pesticide law requires that pesticide dealers be licensed annually. As part of the same investigation, Charles F. White of Cardinal Chemicals Inc. in Kinston agreed to pay $400 for selling restricted-use pesticides to Elliott and Elliott Enterprises of NC Inc.

Al Allen of Allen Aviation Inc. in Aynor, S.C., agreed to pay $400 for damage caused to a wheat field by drift during an aerial pesticide application on a neighboring flax field in Whiteville. Allen also failed to have his aircraft inspected prior to applying pesticides in North Carolina in 2013, as required by state law.

Jeff Cumbie, manager of TruGreen in Fayetteville, agreed to pay $1,000 for damage to a neighbor’s grass and plants due to drift from a pesticide application. During the investigation, it was also discovered that Cumbie’s ground applicator license expired on Dec. 31, 2012 and wasn’t renewed until April 24, 2013. N.C. pesticide law states no person should apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors result in adverse effects. Pesticide law also states that pesticide applicators be licensed annually.

Timothy R. Jedrey, an employee of The Housing Authority of the City of New Bern, agreed to pay $1,500 for damage to perennials, trees and ornamental shrubs on a neighboring property caused by drift from a herbicide. N.C. pesticide law states no person should apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors result in adverse effects.

William D. Hall, an employee of Crabbe Aviation in Mechanicsville, Va., agreed to pay $1,800 for damage caused by drift from an aerial pesticide application to four properties adjacent to fields sprayed in Moyock. N.C. pesticide law states no person should apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors result in adverse effects.

Roland W. Boney Jr. of Rose Hill agreed to pay $300 and to a one-year suspension of his N.C. Pesticide License for pesticide drift that caused damage to a neighbor’s grapevines. N.C. pesticide law states that no person should apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors result in adverse effect.

Woody Allen Ham of Ham Farms Inc. in Snow Hill agreed to pay $700 for drift that caused damage to a neighbor’s hay, apple and pear trees and day lilies. N.C. pesticide law states that no person should apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors result in adverse effect.

Eugene J. Kritter of Kritter Cropdusting Inc, in Culpepper, Va., agreed to pay $800 for failing to have his airplane inspected before applying pesticides to a soybean field in Monroe, as required by state pesticide laws.

Comments

comments

280 x 540
Privacy Policy | Rights & Permissions | Discussion Guidelines

Website Management by Outer Banks Media