Boone Area Chamber Hosts Annual Meeting at Tweetsie, Recognizes Local Award Recipients

Published Thursday, August 13, 2015 at 6:00 pm
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Representatives from Piedmont Federal Savings Bank, the signature sponsor of the event at Tweestie, are pictured at the Boone Area Chamber of Commerce annual meeting on Tuesday. Photo by Ken Ketchie. Pictured from left to right are Ginger Salt, David Smelcer, Ric Wagner, Susan Norris, Neville Chaney, Edward Brown and Diana Proffit.

 

By Jessica Isaacs

Friends, neighbors, entrepreneurs, business partners and local officials convened at Tweetsie Railroad on Tuesday night for the 66th annual meeting of the Boone Area Chamber of Commerce.

Participants enjoyed fellowship, a cowboy barbecue buffet and live music provided by the Harris Brothers.

President Richard Wagner of Piedmont Federal Savings Bank, the meeting’s signature sponsor, delivered a welcome message before the largest crowd ever to attend this annual event. More than 430 tickets were sold this year, compared to 365 last year.

The meeting was held at Tweestie Railroad in Blowing Rock for the third year in a row.

“It’s the only place that can seat than many people in a covered space,” said Chamber President and CEO Dan Meyer. “It’s also one of our iconic businesses and a partner of the chamber. They were a super host last night and we have really enjoyed being at Tweetsie.”

The chamber inducted its 2015-16 Board of Directors and officers and introduced its new chairperson.

The chamber’s 2015-16 Board of Directors includes the following leadership roles:

  • Officers
    • Chair: Gillian Baker, Appalachian Regional Healthcare Systems
    • Chair-Elect: Chuck Eyler, Nationwide Insurance/Eyler Agency
    • Past-Chair: Susan Jones, Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corp.
    • Treasurer: Larry Byerly, JPS Accountants
  • Committee Chairs
    • Leadership Challenge: David Stills, Ray’s Weather
    • Membership Services: Ryan Postlethwait, Yadkin Bank
    • Business Development: Jonathan Lubkemann, BB&T
    • Government Relations: Omer Tomlinson, Charter Communications
    • Government Relations: Mike Hall
    • Community United for Education: Traci Royster, ASU
    • Community United for Education: Jason Parker, Holmes Center
    • At large: Harry Davis, ASU Walker College of Business
    • At large: Brent Keith: SkyLine SkyBest

Meyer delivered the organization’s annual report, addressing new initiatives and programs, strategic partnerships in the community, upcoming events and the success of programs like the annual expo at the Boone Mall, after hours business events and the chamber’s online and social media presence.

Meyer said the annual report gave participating guests a chance to better understand the chamber and what it does for their businesses.

“We’re not here to advertise any individual business. We’re here to promote the business community, expand it and make it look attractive to folks who might want to come here,” Meyer said. “That’s what the chamber is all about — partnership and promotion. We want to partner with people who are doing things well and we want to promote the business community.”

Individuals and businesses in the community were recognized for outstanding service, commitment and growth during the annual awards presentation.

The recipients were gifted unique works of art that reflected their roles in the community rather than trophies or plaques.

After the meeting, guests were invited to enjoy a train ride through Tweetsie Railroad.

“We’re looking forward to an even bigger year this next year and we thank our members for their partnership and support,” Meyer said. “We stand ready to be of help in any way that we can to further business here in the High Country.”

Information on award recipients is listed below, followed by photos by Ken Ketchie from the annual event.

See below the photo gallery for Dan Meyer’s full remarks from the meeting.

 

The President’s Award:

Jeff Stanley, Wahoo’s Outdoor Adventures

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Jeff Stanley receives the President’s Award at Boone chamber’s annual meeting on Tuesday night. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

“Sometimes there just aren’t categories enough to bring attention to certain individuals. Sometimes there are individuals for whom there just aren’t enough words to describe,” Meyer said. “Sometimes there are those who distinguish themselves in unique ways. Sometimes there are those to whom you simply want to say ‘thank you’ for the many ways they have made an impression and impact.”

About Jeff Stanley:

  • Started a business 37 years ago soon after graduating from Appalachian State University.
  • Runs a business that attracts visitors and makes a significant contribution to High Country tourism.
  • “Mr. Promotion” has served as principal advocate for the chamber and has recruited many members in the past year — a true believer in the organization and the economy.

“Jeff, we hope you will always keep paddling upstream,” Meyer said.

 

Wade Brown Award for Community Recognition:

Sheri Moretz

Sponsored by the Boone Golf Club

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Sheri Moretz (center) receives the Wade Brown Community Recognition Award during the annual Boone chamber meeting at Tweetsie Railroad on Tuesday. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

“It’s impossible to put into words the positive impact that this rare individual has had on our community,” Meyer said. “A more dedicated or harder worker you’ll never meet – and not for the pay or for praise, but for love of this community.”

About Sheri Moretz:

  • Respected throughout the community for her honesty, kindness, creativity, organization strong convictions and passion for service.
  • Has long been known for her hard work behind the scenes to hold programs, organizations and events together.
  • Has served in countless leadership roles and on community advisory boards, including Downtown Boone Development Association, Caldwell Community College, Appalachian Theatre, High Country Host and many others.

“For those who have the privilege to work with her, you are fortunate. For those who are lucky enough to call her ‘friend,’ you are blessed,” Meyer said. “Being acknowledged and honored publicly is the last thing she would ever want or expect, but we are pleased to have the opportunity to honor her.”

 

Alfred Adams Award for Economic Development:

North Carolina Agricultural Extension, New River Light and Power

Sponsored by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.

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Representatives from the Watauga Cooperative Extension and New River Light and Power accept the Alfred Adams Award for Economic Development from the Boone chamber at Tuesday’s annual meeting. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

“It’s about time we honor two entities that are each celebrating 100 years of service,” Meyer said. “No two businesses better reflect the interdependence of farm and city.”

About New River Light and Power:

  • Began helping Dr. B.B. Dougherty’s vision of providing electric power for Appalachian Training School and the Town of Boone
  • Had only six customers in 1915, now has 7,500
  • Had only 15 miles of power lines in 1924, now has more than 91 circuit miles of lines, five substations and more than 1,800 transformers

Facts about the Watauga County Cooperative Extension (according to its five-year impact report):

  • Produced more than $918,000 in grant funding for farmers, producers and partner organizations.
  • Provided education on fresh foods to 1,500 elementary schoolchildren and after-school or summer enrichment education in life-skills, science, agriculture and natural resources to more than 3,000 youth.
  • More than 1,800 volunteers contributed more than 17,800 hours of community service.

 

Ben Suttle Special Services Award for Volunteerism:

ASU’s Appalachian and the Community Together program

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Kate Johnson of ASU’s ACT receives the Ben Suttle Award for Volunteerism on Tuesday night at the Boone chamber’s annual meeting. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

“Appalachian State University’s A.C.T office utilizes the acronym which stands for Appalachian and the Community Together,” Meyer said. ” This could not be a better or more accurate moniker for this kind, powerful and impactful group.”

App State ACT volunteerism by the numbers:

  • 68 tons of materials diverted from landfills
  • 4,190 lbs. of food collected
  • $435,000 in funds raised
  • 960,000 hours of service
  • $21 million of human resource value to local nonprofits

 

Sue Wilmoth Award for the Advancement of Tourism:

High Country Host

Sponsored by the Boone and Watauga Tourism Development Authorities

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Ben McKethan of High Country Host (center) accepts the Boone chamber’s Sue Wilmoth Award for Tourism Advancement at Tuesday night’s annual meeting at Tweetsie. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

“For over 35 years, the High Country Host and its Visitor Center has been our ‘go-to’ source for all things tourism,” Meyer said. “Let’s join together and thank the High Country Host for their impact on tourism and our economy.”

Some of the services provided by High Country Host:

  • Promotion off the mountain (magazine and media ads, 80,000 vacation/travel planners, website presence)
  • Information and directions on the mountain (maps and brochures, travel information, rest stop)
  • Cooperative advertising

 

everGREEN Award for Leadership in Sustainability

VPC Builders

Sponsored by the Mast General Store

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A representative of VPC Builders (left) accepts Boone Chamber’s everGREEN Award for Sustainability at Tweetsie Railroad Tuesday night during the annual meeting. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

“Sometimes we need help to know that to do and that we can,” Meyer said. “This year’s winner certainly can do just that.”

A few customer testimonials about VPC Builders:

  • The quality of the craftsmanship your crew, subcontractors and business contacts were all impressive. It is obvious that they all share your passion for excellence and quality.
  • I wish we had more money so we could build another house with you!
  • This project was a dream come true. The staff was very helpful and professional. They had much experience with vendors in the area and our job foreman was a dream. “

 

Photos from the Boone Area Chamber of Commerce 2015 Annual Meeting:

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Members of the Boone chamber 2015-16 Board of Directors are inducted at the annual meeting at Tweetsie Railroad on Tuesday night. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

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Members of the Boone chamber 2015-16 Board of Directors are inducted at the annual meeting at Tweetsie Railroad on Tuesday night. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

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Boone chamber Director of Operations Barbara Armstrong enjoys greeting the crowd at the annual meeting on Tuesday. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

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Boone Area Chamber of Commerce annual meeting at Tweetsie Railroad on Tuesday night. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

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Boone Area Chamber of Commerce annual meeting at Tweetsie Railroad on Tuesday night. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

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Boone Area Chamber of Commerce annual meeting at Tweetsie Railroad on Tuesday night. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

 

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Boone chamber’s new board chair Gillian Baker introduces herself to the crowd at the organization’s annual meeting on Tuesday. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

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Bill Hagna and David Still enjoyed a meal together before the presentations began.

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Boone chamber past chair Susan Jones (left) and new chair Gillian Baker (center) are pictured with President’s Award winner Jeff Stanley at the annual meeting on Tuesday. Photo by Ken Ketchie.

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Attendees had a chance to take a ride on Tweetsie Railroad Train after the meeting ended.

 

 

Dan Meyer’s full remarks on special recognitions and the awards presentation:


President’s Award – Energizer Bunny / Spizzerinktom Award / Enthusiasm Award

Sometimes there just aren’t categories enough to bring attention to certain individuals. Sometimes there are individuals for whom there just aren’t enough words to describe.

Sometimes there are those who distinguish themselves in unique ways.

Sometimes there are those to whom you simply want to say ‘thank you’ for the many ways they have made an impression and impact.

Tonight I want to honor one of those individuals – let me describe him this way:

Enthusiastic, even bombastic

Committed

Frank and to the point, out-spoken

Creative and innovative

Entrepreneurial – takes risks, takes initiative

            and the list could go on

This individual started a business 37 years ago – right out of ASU and has made a significant contribution to High Country tourism. The business is an attractor of visitors. He has expanded his operation over the years with creative new programs and made significant financial investment in property and buildings.

The business is also a promoter of tourism in general – creating a tab newspaper, establishing a brochure distribution service and starting an advertising agency.

But he’s done more than that – he has been the single biggest recruiter for members to the Boone Area Chamber of Commerce this past year. He literally delivered them to our door. He’s a true believer in the Chamber and our Boone Area economy. He is Mr. Promotion.

And he is the only man who still calls me ‘Danny Boy!’

It is my pleasure to present the President’s Award for Spizzerinktom to one of the High Country’s biggest supporters – Mr. Jeff Stanley of Wahoo’s Outdoor Adventures.

Jeff, we hope you will always keep paddling upstream!

It is now my pleasure to present our annual award winners.

Wade Brown Award for Community Recognition:

The Community Recognition Award is our Chamber’s oldest award, going back to 1979. At our 50th anniversary celebration in 1999, we designated this award to honor of Mr. Wade Brown, an early pillar of our community. This award recognizes significant contributions to the High Country through community involvement and investment. Appropriately, this award is sponsored by the Boone Golf Club.

It’s impossible to put into words the positive impact that this rare individual has had on our community. A more dedicated or harder worker you’ll never meet – and not for the pay or for praise, but for love of this community.

For more than two decades, this behind the scenes worker has impacted the success of many of the signature events, programs, and initiatives in the High Country. For those who have the privilege to work with her, you are fortunate; for those who lucky enough to call her “friend,” you are blessed. Being acknowledged and honored publicly is the last thing she would ever want or expect, but we are pleased to have the opportunity to honor her.

The nominator had this to say: “When I think about this person, who she was to me, and what impact she had my life, some very strange things popped into my head.

  1. She is the first person I would choose if I needed a partner for the Amazing Race.
  1. If she were a Disney character, she would be the Fairy Godmother from Cinderella. When it’s 11:59, the night before your event, and everything is going wrong…no volunteers…no press….40 degrees and one lousy golf ball from Ray…. you’re losing hope…and your event is quickly moving from perfect to a big pile of pumpkin puree…IN SHE COMES to save the day! She is always available, willing to listen, and most importantly, she is ALWAYS willing to roll up her sleeves throw on her boots, and jump in to help.
  1. She can still fit into her middle school Cheerleading uniform (this has NO relevance to anything, just one of the many things that I find UNBELIEVABLE but I know to be true because I’ve seen it).

 There is no way to measure the impact her efforts and creativity have had on our local economy. She has a way of coming up with out of the box ideas, unconventional solutions, and complex compromises, all while holding fast to her core values. She is a woman of impeccable character, honest and kind. She is not afraid to speak the truth and tackle the tough questions. Most days, you can find her at her “day job”, helping to promote and build the brand of one of the most successful companies in the country. If she’s not there, you might find her dressed in some crazy costume, handing out water and fruit at an “Aid Tent” for Blood, Sweat, and Gears, or helping plan a concert series, festival, or event. You can also find her keeping score on the sidelines at Appalachian State basketball games, playing softball in the local Women’s league, serving in a leadership role for the DBDA, CCC&TI community advisory board, Appalachian theatre board, High Country host and other community Boards or Committees. You may have even spotted her, back in 2011, on the corner of King and Depot Street at 3:30 in the morning, helping to install the Doc Watson statue. Not only did she help plan, coordinate, and execute the unveiling celebration, she met me at midnight to help install the statue so that we could have a surprise unveiling.

She is a master when it comes to helping develop and maintain a successful Board or Organization. She has helped write or modify by-laws, policies, and mission statements countless times, has volunteered more hours, and typed more minutes than any one person I know. Her long history and involvement in this community has equipped her with a vast knowledge and institutional memory of the “behind the scenes” history of our community that is simply priceless.

The nominator has a picture of our winner, taped to the corner of my computer- it’s been there for quite a while….she’s holding a wand, wearing a pink tutu, a tiara and a shirt that says, “ I feel fairly certain that given a cape and a tiara, I could save the world.”   I have no doubt….

Please welcome and thank Sheri Moretz – winner of the 2015 Wade Brown Award for Community Recognition.

Alfred Adams Award for Economic Development

The Alfred Adams Economic Development Award recognizes individuals and/or organizations who have worked for the orderly growth and development of Boone and Watauga County. Mr. Adams was a true community banker, where business was done with a handshake and where your word was your bond.

Sponsored by Wells Fargo Bank.

What is 200 years old and has been the foundation of our High Country Economy? What entities have brought a history of community service to both town and the country? Who do we count on to keep the lights on in our homes and businesses and keep fresh local farm products on our tables? And who together light up our Christmas trees?

It’s about time we honor two entities that are each celebrating 100 years of service – the North Carolina Agricultural Extension and New River Light & Power. No two businesses better reflect the interdependence of farm and city.

*******

It was only 100 years ago that residents of Boone had to read by candle or lamp light and any house hold appliance had to be powered by a good dose of elbow grease. But in 1915, electricity made its first appearance in Boone at the Appalachian Training School for Teachers..

This year New River Light and Power Company (NRLP) observes its 100th Anniversary.

It all started with the vision of the Dougherty brothers founded Watauga Academy in 1899. The founders had the vision that to run an effective college, they needed electricity to bring reliable and safe lighting to classrooms and offices.

Electricity supplied by the first hydroelectric plant was inconsistent at best. The output of the hydro generators varied depending on the water level behind the dam. – as the river rose, the generator would speed up, and the lights would become very bright. As the depth of the river fell, the generator would slow down, dimming the lights considerably.”

Demand was initially small. In 1915, NRLP only had six customers – today over 7,500 customers. To keep up with demand, the utility infrastructure had to grow too. In 1924 NRLP had only 15 miles of power lines – today over 91 circuit miles of lines, five substations and over 1800 transformers

In celebration of the Centennial, NRLP donated 100 trees that were planted the week of April 20th, mostly along the path on the Greenway Trail and at Jimmy Smith Park. NRLP teamed up with ASU’s Landscaping and The Town of Boone’s crews to complete this monumental task. A second event will be an Anniversary Celebration and Tree Dedication scheduled for Thursday, September 10, 2015. This will take place at the Clawson-Burnley Park on Hunting Hills Lane just across from the National Guard Armory.

Beginning back with Dr. B.B. Dougherty’s vision of electric power for Appalachian Training School and the Town of Boone, NRLP has been a major contributor to the quality of life and the growth and productivity of this area. NRLP has served Boone’s residents, schools, businesses, and its university for 100 years and looks forward to continuing to innovate and improve service over the next 100 years.

The North Carolina Agricultural Extension Agency is in its 100th year of service to our High Country agricultural community.

Here are some state from the WATAUGA COUNTY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION FIVE-YEAR IMPACT REPORT

Total Economic Impact: $2 million dollars [this is not agricultural production]

Includes total value of grant dollars brought into the county, value of volunteer hours contributed through Extension events, herd loss recovery assistance, and direct reported economic impact to farmers and the agricultural economy.

  • 956 meetings, workshops, field days, demonstrations, lectures and programs to 31,000
  • Over 191,000 individual contacts (emails, face-to-face contact, phone calls, & newsletters).
  • Produced over $918,000 in grant funding to farmers, producers, and partner organizations.
  • The Watauga Cattlemen’s Association — serving approximately 150 cattle producers in county. Total county herd size of beef & cow/calf ranges from 4,000-8,000 in any given year. With an average value per animal @ $1,200 = over $7 million.
  • 47 Christmas tree growers in the Watauga County Christmas Tree Association with 2,000 acres in production (~ 2 million trees).
  • 29 choose-and-cut farms selling an average of 15,000 trees per year. Estimated county economic impact of over $5 million for choose-and-cut.
  • Operation Medicine Cabinet collected over 132 gallons of liquid and 1.5 million pills from over 1,600 participants.
  • Extension’s annual Farm-City Banquet brings over 200 community members together to recognize the impacts of individuals to our county’s agricultural economy and heritage.
  • 1,500 elementary schoolchildren learned how to plant/eat fresh vegetables.
  • Over 3,000 youth have received afterschool or summer enrichment in life-skills, science, agriculture, and natural resource
  • Over 1,800 volunteers contributed over 17,800 hours of community service @ $10/hour = $178,000.
  • Over 2,000 visitors have participated in the High Country Farm Tour
  • Over 1,800 county residents received canning, cooking, nutrition and food safety training.
  • Over 700 volunteers removed over 18,960 lbs. of trash from the Watauga River with Big Sweep.
  • Approximately 10,000 linear feet of stream banks have been enhanced/stabilized to prevent erosion.
  • 69 Master Gardeners were trained and have contributed over 2,000 hours of volunteer service..
  • Extension provides licensing, certification, and continuing education training, and technical support.

It is a delight to present these two 100 year old institutions and pillars of our economy with the 2015 Alfred Adams Award for Economic Development.

Ben Suttle Special Services Award for volunteerism.

The Ben Suttle Special Services Award recognizes the spirit of volunteerism in the community. The late Ben Suttle served as the Chamber’s chief volunteer leader in 1992. He was a well-respected merchant in town who also served on the Boone Town Council.

Volunteerism by the numbers:

68 tons of materials diverted from landfills

4190 lbs. of food collected

$435,000 funds raised

960,000 hours of service

$21 million of human resource value to local non-profits

‘Nuff said!

That is the contribution of our Ben Suttle Volunteerism Award winner for 2015.

Appalachian State University’s A.C.T office utilizes the acronym which stands for Appalachian and the Community Together. This could not be a better or more accurate moniker for this kind, powerful and impactful group.

The A.C.T. office and its exponential team of volunteers has made a world of difference for a laundry list of nonprofits in the High Country.

Through their unique Board Fellows Program, college students are given the opportunity to get real world experience by shadowing Boards of local nonprofits.

ACT office employees are actively paving the way for a new generation of engaged citizenship. By leading the way themselves, they show what a strong volunteer and community leader looks like. Employers regularly reach out to Appalachian State University faculty members and encourage service learning projects across learning pathways.

The ACT office hosts a variety service days and fundraisers for our community, including the well known MLK challenge, Dance Marathon, Alternative Spring Break, the BIG sale, the Gobbler 5k, The Hunger Games and Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week.

Again…astoundingly, since 2004-05, over 21 million dollars of value has been contributed to the community from the A.C.T. program (960,000 hours of service plus $435,000 funds raised).

Elizabeth Young, Executive Director of the Hunger and Health Coalition said. “I know I can speak for other non-profit leaders and community members when I say THANK YOU to the A.C.T. office! This amazing and dedicated group has made a tremendous and impressive impact in bettering our community as well as paving the way in shaping our future leaders of tomorrow.”

Let’s all say thank you to ACT – ASUs Appalachian Community Together program.

 

Sue Wilmoth Award for the Advancement of Tourism

The Sue W. Wilmoth Award for the Advancement of Tourism is named for former Chamber director Sue W. Wilmoth. Sue’s unique success in tourism promotion was her ability to capitalize on the regions natural resources while balancing progress with preservation. Sue consistently focused on initiatives that improved the quality of life for our residents and visitors.

[Thanks to the Boone and Watauga Tourism Development Authority for sponsoring this award]

Will there be snow on Christmas?

When is Christmas this year?

When are the peak days of fall colors?

What will the weather be like on Thanksgiving?

When do the rhododendrons bloom?

Is there enough snow for skiing?

When do the golf courses open/close?

What’s happen next weekend?

How come the hotel rates are so high in July…October?

Do you have maps?

Who you goina’ call for tourist information?

Here’s just some of the services our winner provides:

  • Promotion off the mountain
    • Magazine and media advertisements
    • 80,000 vacation/travel planners
    • Website presence
    • Information and directions on the mountain
  • Maps / brochures / and the ever-popular bathroom
    • Where else can you get travel information and KFC in the same stop?
  • Cooperative advertising – enticing/bringing them up to the High Country
    • It’s all about promotion

They bring them up the mountain to us and our local hospitality/attractions/and business members all deliver the goods through customer service that strives to exceed expectations.

Tourism is the front door to vacation/second home/retirement living as well as attracting individuals and business who would like to call the High Country home. I think you will all agree that there is no better place on earth to call home!

So who does it all that stuff? For over 35 years, the High Country Host and its Visitor Center has been our ‘go-to’ source for all things tourism.

Let’s join together and thank the High Country Host for their impact on tourism and our economy.

everGREEN Award for Leadership in Sustainability

Some of the goals of the everGREEN Committee have been:

  • To help businesses or individuals increase the sustainability and resilience of their life styles through the application of Best Practices for energy and water conservation, purchase of local products and services
  • To promote sustainable development by linking businesses or individuals interested in increasing their sustainability with green product and service providers/vendors

Along with these criteria, they reflected on the Mast General Store philosophy of reuse and renewal as they open and operate stores in areas of downtown business revitalization.

This years winner of the everGREEN Award for Leadership in Sustainability are masters at that.

They understand that there is a scale from good to better to best and they help their customers find the level that is right and SUSTAINABLLE for them.

As builders they know that every customer is not a potential LEED certified home customer but for those who are they can help them achieve that certification, even to LEED Gold.

“Doing the right thing while offering choice and control” is a powerful mantra.

And what about customer satisfaction? Here are a few of the many glowing testimonials:

  • Your professionalism and “vision” for our house were an ideal combination. You always listened to us and went out of your way to confirm that what you were creating was always in line with what we wanted.
  • The quality of the craftsmanship your crew, subcontractors and business contacts were all impressive. It is obvious that they all share your passion for excellence and quality.
  • Your attention to detail and accessibility is unparalleled. Your commitment to staying within our budget and delivering the house on time has been well beyond our expectations. You always managed to remind us of the budget yet continually found a way to deliver “affordable quality.”
  • I wish we had more money so we could build another house with you!
  • This project was a dream come true. The staff was very helpful and professional. They had much experience with vendors in the area and our job foreman was a dream. “

SOMETIMES WE NEED HELP TO KNOW WHAT TO DO AND THAT WE CAN. This year’s winner certainly can do just that.

Please join us in to recognizing and congratulating VPC Builders, 2015 winner of the everGREEN Award for Leadership in Sustainability sponsored by Mast General Store.

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