Email Announcements We Received This Week: See What’s Going On Around The Community

Published Monday, February 17, 2014 at 10:07 am

1) ASAP’s 4th Annual CSA Fair March 13

CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) subscribers receive a weekly box of fresh locally grown produce or meats throughout the growing season. ASAP’s CSA Fair is an opportunity for you to meet farmers face-to-face and learn more about their CSA programs and products. You can sign up to learn more from farmers, or bring your checkbook to subscribe on the spot! Groups from workplaces and congregations are encouraged to attend, as many farms will deliver direct to these locations if numbers allow. This event is FREE and open to the public. Call us at 828-236-1282 with questions. 

2) ASAP’s 4th Annual High Country Fair March 4

CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) subscribers receive a weekly box of fresh locally grown produce or meats throughout the growing season. ASAP’s CSA Fair is an opportunity for you to meet farmers face-to-face and learn more about their CSA programs and products. You can sign up to learn more from farmers, or bring your checkbook to subscribe on the spot! Groups from workplaces and congregations are encouraged to attend, as many farms will deliver direct to these locations if numbers allow.

3) Student Recital Held Feb. 23

Students from Appalachian State University’s Hayes School of Music will present a recital Feb. 23 as part of the National Association of Schools of Music’s (NASM) accreditation site visit. The recital begins at 8 p.m. in Broyhill Music Center’s Rosen Concert Hall. Admission is free. Among the works to be performed is the first movement of Antonín Dvořák’s “String Quartet Op. 96 in F Major,” the prelude from Bach’s “Suite No. 2 for Cello, BWV 1008,” “Songs of Appalachia” by William Harbinson and “Ballade No.1 in G minor” by  Frédéric Chopin. Works for alto saxophone, bassoon, euphonium, marimba and voice will also be performed. NASM is an association of approximately 647 schools of music, primarily at the collegiate level. It is the national accrediting agency for music and music-related disciplines. 

4) Symphonic Band an Wind Ensemble Performs Feb. 20

Expect a rousing evening when the Appalachian Symphonic Band an the Appalachian Wind Ensemble perform Feb. 20 in the Schaefer Center for the Performing Arts at Appalachian State University. The performance begins at 8 a.m. and admission is free. The Symphonic band opens the evening with “Circus Overture” by William Schuman, who wrote, “The opening is a grandiose orchestral version of ‘Ladies and Gentlemen’ – this is the barker attracting attention to his side show.” The band also will perform “Mock Morris” by Percy Grainger, “Escapades” by John Williams, “A Childhood Remembered” by Rossano Galante and “Barnum and Bailey’s Favorite” by Karl King. Dr.  Kevin Gray Richardson is the conductor and Brooke Humfeld and Justin Hensley are the graduate conductors. Saxophonist Scott Kallestad will be featured soloist on “Escapades.” The wind ensemble will be directed by Dr. John Stanley Ross and Richardson. The program is comprised of “Prelude, Fugue, and Riffs” by Leonard Bernstein featuring clarinetist Oran Dickens, “Chester Overture” by William Schuman, “Trauersinfonie” by Richard Wagner, “Aegean Festival Overture” by Andreas Makris, “Nessun Dorma” from Giacomo Puccini’s “Turandot” featuring tenor John Fowler, “Action Front March” by H. L. Blankenburg and “March” from “Symphonic Metamorphosis” by Paul Hindemith.  

5) Horse Helpers of the High Country Needs Volunteers

We are a 501c3, nonprofit organization that gives sick, abused and unwanted horses a second chance. We ned help in every aspect of horse care, running of a farm, barn, computer and a business. Please given Betsy Nicholls a call at 828-264-4029 or 704-607-9604 and visit the website at horsehelpersnc.org for more information. 

6) Local Photographers Host February Display at Boone Mall

For the month of February, Bob and Sharon Caldwell, Mary Beth Hege and Greg williams will showcase a selection of children, families, brides and baby portraits. These photographers work independently and get together this month to have you enjoy image of our local people and our environment. Bob and Sharon Caldwell began their work in Boone in 1978.  They work together in primarily portrait and wedding photography.   Bob is an ASU graduate and a graduate in photography from Randolph Technical Institute families and brides.  Please give them a call at 828-264-9026.   Sharon has many talents, only one of which is her wonderful ease of working with families and brides. Please give them a call at 828-264-9026. The studio of Mary Beth Hege is located at 1372 Deck Hill Road, but much of the portraiture is outdoors or on location.  Her concentration is mainly on families, children and seniors.  Maybe because she is now a grandmother, her new love is photographing newborns.  “What a fun job to get to hold and play with these sweet babies!”  If you are expecting, come by the mall and pick up a card to get a free newborn session and 8 x 10 portrait.  There will be other specials going on through the month of February. Give Mary Beth a call at 828-264-0813. Greg Williams is a local photographer who enjoys traveling and working with people of all ages.  He and his wife, Alice (a theater costume designer) have captured weddings and portraits from Baltimore, Seattle to Texas, Jamaica and beyond.  He has extensive formal training in photography at both undergraduate and graduate levels, and brings a wealth of professional experience in lighting and event support to every project.  Whether in the studio or on location, his goal is to produce lasting images and friendships. Reach Greg at www.positivecontrast.com.

7) Spelling Bee for Grown Ups March 18

Now is the time to select your 4-member team for the Boone Area Chamber’s annual Grown Up Spelling Bee. Once again, the bee is sponsored by Yadkin Bank. They also provided some great awards to our Watauga County School bee winners. We thank them for their support of education in our public schools. This year’s bee is scheduled for 5 p.m. Tuesday, March 18 at the Watauga High School Gymnasium. All you need to do is find your best spellers. We even provide you with some “bee bucks” to keep you in the competition when your spelling skills fail. You can even purchase extras, and from past experience, you may need them. Each team is requested to create a theme represented by their costumes and table decorations, prizes will be given for the best in both categories. Use your imagination! Who can forget the BREMCO ‘Bright Ideas’ helmets with light bulbs? Don’t forget that a portion of the night’s proceeds will advance the work of educational projects in Boone. 

8) ASU Alumni Weekend at Beech Mountain Resort March 1-2

Coordinated by the High Country Appalachian Alumni Chapter, the weekend will feature special discounts for alumni and families, as well as a private Mountaineer Alumni Event. After a fun-filled day on the slopes, visit our Alpine Village for some ice skating, shopping, dining or a pint of beer at our new brewery. To cap the day, join fellow Mountaineer Alums at the Appalachian State University Alumni Association Mixer at the Beech Tree Bar and Grill. Register through the Appalachian State University Alumni Association to receive discounted rates. $30 day or twilight lift ticket, $45 full day lift ticket, $18 ski rental, $25 snowboard rental, $10 first time beginner lessons and $5 ice skating. 

9) Veiling the Late Roman House Lecture at Smith Gallery

The Smith Gallery and the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts at Appalachian State University presents Veiling the Late Roman House, a lecture by Dr. John Stephenson, an assistant professor in the Department of Art. The lecture will be held Feb. 19 at 6:30 p.m. in the Lecture Hall at the Turchin Center. This lecture is presented by the Smith Gallery and TCVA as part of the Department of Art Faculty Biennial 2014 exhibition that is currently on view at both venues. The period of late antiquity, c. 200-500 AD, saw a dramatic increase in social, political and religious significance as well as the types and numbers, of domestic textiles, as is revealed in references in literature and art, and in the finds of archaeological textiles in Roman Egypt. This talk explores the roles of textiles, particularly hangings and curtains, in such domestic settings in the late Roman period from a social perspective- how they served the increased concerns with privacy, visibility, mystery, boundaries, and shifting gender relations that are amply attested in late Roman culture.  Stephenson argues that alongside more permanent forms of permeable boundaries, textiles were exploited for their unique inherent qualities to serve diverging needs in the late Roman house, and filled a role far out of proportion to the scant remains preserved from ancient settings today.

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